Being a social activist

Hmm, as a buyer of fruit juice containers, occasionally I wonder if these containers which are made of tetra-pack can be dropped into the plastic recycling bin for recycling…

So I happen to drink Marigold “peel fresh” brand of juice and the bottle does not contain any recycling sort of mark or anything. So I did some research and I read somewhere that tetra pack containers indeed can be deposited in the “plastic” recycling bin and it will be sorted out at the recycling centre.

Hmm, I start to wonder if I can write in to the company and suggest that they incorporate some sort of recycling mark so that fellow buyers of such juice will know and be reminded that these containers can be recycled.

But of course I have zero faith that the company will adopt my suggestion anyway. I kind of wonder if I have to build a business case to justify why they should add the mark or some description… like perhaps find out how many containers were actually recycled against the numbers that were manufactured or sold.

To do so, one interesting method I could do is to do a poll of people to ask them if they know that tetra-pack containers can be recycled. If a lot of people responded “no” then it gives some justification.

This interestingly makes me a social activist already!

Hmm defined by a website from Amherst College as

Social activism is an intentional action with the goal of bringing about social change. If you feel strongly about a cause and are working towards a change, you could be considered an activist.

I am interestingly being one. So I first got a flavour of social activist from listening to audio tapes on the history of public health using my iphone using this app called itunes u. In summary, a lot of individuals have stood up and made a difference in getting governments to recognise that they need to tackle public health which shows that you know, you can make a difference too!

You can look at the very good public health audio tapes from John Hopkins by following this link:

https://itunes.apple.com/us/course/the-history-of-public-health/id535929070

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